Joe Schermoly

Joe Schermoly

Consultant

Joe joined Charcoalblue after spending ten years designing and building sets in theatres of all sizes across Chicago and in London.

joe.schermoly@charcoalblue.com

+1 312 766 7790

He brings his long experience in design for live performance, project management, and scenic and technical systems to all his work in Charcoalblue. His ambition is to optimize the experiences of the audience, performers and technicians by maintaining a holistic view of the project and all the people that are part of the process of live theatre.

If you were to establish your own venue, what would you call it?

If I had a venue I would call it The Summit. It’s both a place where people meet and a high point to be reached for.

… and what would that venue specialize in? Dance, live music, theatre…?

I am most interested in storytelling that can cross formal boundaries of text, body and music, so I would hope to bring playwrights and choreographers together with actors and dancers to create visceral events that push an audience’s boundaries in engaging with words and movement.

What qualities should a 'great performance space' have?

A performance space is great when it has been designed for the work that will inhabit it. Every company is different and engages their artmaking in a unique way and so their space should be able to respond to those needs. A performance venue must also invite the audience in to be an active member of the events that are produced. Whether they are a small group of individuals in a promenade play or a mass gathering to witness an epic opera, the presence of the audience must be an integral part of the design.

What first sparked your love of theatre or performing arts?

The project of always producing something new and present has always been for me the most thrilling part of making theatre. We make an event together in this one time and in this one space, and it can only live on so long as the audiences are interested in seeing it. Once the time for its usefulness has past, the piece disappears, and we are tasked with creating a new vision.

Joe Schermoly